From the Chief's Desk

Welcome to the Lemont Police Department website. The Police Department consists of men and women committed to the safety and well being of our residents and visitors. It is the mission of the Lemont Police Department to safeguard the lives and property of the people we serve, to reduce the incidence of fear and crime and to enhance the public safety while partnering with our residents to improve their quality of life. 
     

Motorcycle Awareness Month

May is Motorcycle Awareness Month.  The Village of Lemont and the Lemont Police Department join Illinois Law Enforcement and Motorcycle Safety Awareness groups to urge all motorists to join in an effort to improve safety and awareness on our streets.  Be aware of motorcycles and recognize the importance of motorcycle safety. Below are tips from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation. 

 

Nine Things All Car & Truck Drivers Should Know About Motorcycles

 
 

1.   Over half of all fatal motorcycle crashes involve another vehicle. Most of the time, the car or truck driver, not the motorcyclist, is at fault. There are a lot more cars and trucks than motorcycles on the road, and some drivers don't "recognize" a motorcycle – they ignore it (usually unintentionally). 
 
2.     Because of its narrow profile, a motorcycle can be easily hidden in a car’s blind spots (door/roof pillars) or masked by objects or backgrounds outside a car (bushes, fences, bridges, etc). Take an extra moment to look for motorcycles, whether you're changing lanes or turning at intersections.
 
3.      Because of its small size, a motorcycle may look farther away than it is.  It may also difficult to judge a motorcycle’s speed. When checking traffic to turn at an intersection or into (or out of) a driveway, predict a motorcycle is closer than it looks.  
 

4.     Motorcyclists often slow by downshifting or merely rolling off the throttle, thus not activating the brake light. Allow more following distance, say 3 or 4 seconds. At intersections, predict a motorcyclist may slow down without visual warning.  
 

5.     Motorcyclists often adjust position within a lane to be seen more easily and to minimize the effects of road debris, passing vehicles, and wind. Understand that motorcyclists adjust lane position for a purpose, not to be reckless or show off or to allow you to share the lane with them.  

 6.     Turn signals on a motorcycle usually are not self-canceling, thus some riders (especially beginners) sometimes forget to turn them off after a turn or lane change. Make sure a motorcycle's signal is for real.  
 

7.     Maneuverability is one of a motorcycle's better characteristics, especially at slower speeds and with good road conditions, but don't expect a motorcyclist to always be able to dodge out of the way.  
 

8.     Stopping distance for motorcycles is nearly the same as for cars, but slippery pavement makes stopping quickly difficult. Allow more following distance behind a motorcycle because you can't always stop "on a dime."  
 

9.     When a motorcycle is in motion, see more than the motorcycle – see the person under the helmet, who could be your friend, neighbor, or relative.

 

 




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Marc Maton Photo
  1. Marc Maton

    Chief of Police
    Phone: (630) 257-2229